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Ultimate with epilepsy [message #138908] Wed, 22 January 2014 13:50 Go to next message
formeryhb
Messages: 3
Registered: January 2014
Junior Member
I do not want to post my name just yet, but I have been playing ultimate since I was in middle school. I am now a junior in college, and competed at D1 nationals last year. I was recently diagnosed with epilepsy. I do not get grand mal seizures, but I do get partial seizures very frequently (basically every other day) which make brain function as well as most motor function difficult for short periods of time. I am taking medication for it but that is only doing so much. I have yet to play ultimate, but I imagine that the my first practice back will be very difficult. I was wondering if there are any RSDers out there that have been dealing with epilepsy or have had a buddy or teammate who have had this condition and would have any insight on how to deal with it on and off the field
Re: Ultimate with epilepsy [message #138915 is a reply to message #138908] Wed, 22 January 2014 22:44 Go to previous messageGo to next message
jrehm3
Messages: 2
Registered: April 2012
Location: Arkansas
Junior Member
I was diagnosed with epilepsy in the 8th grade and started playing ultimate in graduate school. I have had a handful of full blown seizures, where I was on the ground shaking the last one happened over 8 years ago. The doctor's told me that I have what they described as a mini seizure every few minutes (only picked up via sleep deprivation type tests) and that I would zone out for a split second when it would happen. I have noticed the zoning out since, while playing sports. The best things that have helped me have been getting enough sleep, not skipping meals, and forgoing alcohol (not successful). The zoning out is the worst thing that has happened during the course of a game and generally happens on the sideline. Best of luck.
Re: Ultimate with epilepsy [message #138932 is a reply to message #138915] Thu, 23 January 2014 11:25 Go to previous messageGo to next message
formeryhb
Messages: 3
Registered: January 2014
Junior Member
Thank you for your reply. It's great to know that there is at least someone else in the ultimate community who has been going through the same thing. I get the exact same thing, with the zoning out and whatnot, although I can tell when they are about to happen because my shoulder will start twitching nonstop, just like someone's eye will twitch if they're stressed. Once I zone out however, my lower back starts to jerk around. Because of the warning signs, I can tell when I shouldn't drive or do anything important, but it may be very problematic while playing especially if it happens halfway through a point. Has that ever happened to you? What do you do in that situation? Injury? Meal and sleep schedules are also difficult to adhere to being a college student and all but I'll do my best.
Re: Ultimate with epilepsy [message #138935 is a reply to message #138908] Thu, 23 January 2014 14:31 Go to previous messageGo to next message
gleapha
Messages: 30
Registered: May 2010
Member
I just graduated and played throughout college but after serious injuries I no longer play. I've hung up the cleats but I'll try to briefly share a couple of things. I was diagnosed my senior year of high school after a fall/shaking on the ground and after tests (sleep deprivation, seizure grade MRIs, CTs, etc) my doctors found I had scar tissue on my temporal lobe causing partial seizures. I was put on lamotrigine and lived fairly normally for about a year other than not being able to drive (SC state law). I began to have seizures once again and was put on a different medicine, lamictal. I've suffered very few seizures since then. Similar to what jrehm3 said my doctor has always said taking medicine at the same time of day, enough sleep consistently, good diet, avoiding alcohol (try not to drink as much as I used to). I still have times in which I zone out, develop a stare/fixation, and have an out of body experience (scared the crap out of me the first time it happened). My short term memory had noticeably changed and the way I have to study and my approach to school in general has changed a lot. One thing to think about with ultimate is concussions. Bottom line if I could still play I would be out there playing it's worth the risk to me as I'm sure it is to you. I would say just be cautious and if you don't feel good take a practice or a tournament off and definitely keep your teammates in the loop. Good luck to you.
Re: Ultimate with epilepsy [message #138938 is a reply to message #138932] Thu, 23 January 2014 17:27 Go to previous messageGo to next message
mtamada
Messages: 32
Registered: August 2011
Member
formeryhb wrote on Thu, 23 January 2014 11:25

[...]
it may be very problematic while playing especially if it happens halfway through a point. Has that ever happened to you? What do you do in that situation? Injury?


Calling an injury timeout would be what I would recommend. Even though there's no blood, no separated shoulder, etc. IME even poor-spirited players recognize and respect the necessity of injury timeouts.

I don't have firsthand experience with seizures, but here are a couple of analogous situations with seemingly invisible injuries: one time I failed to warm-up, just got on the line and we pulled the disc. One-third of the way down the field I strained a calf muscle; I've seen the same thing happen to other athletes, one minute they're sprinting and then they slow down with a quizzical look on their face because you know something's wrong but you can't figure out what because hey nothing really happened you were simply running. But then the next couple of steps the burning pain in your calf tells you that you better slow down and now you feel like a doofus slowing to a crawl while your teammates are sprinting down to cover the pull, and you have to call out "Injury!" with no one within 20 yards of you, no twisted ankle in a gopher hole, no nothing. But if you try to sprint you're likely to tear that calf muscle so there's only one good call to make in this situation: injury sub.

The other situation is asthma attacks. For some reason players on the teams that I've advised have been reluctant to call an injury timeout when they have an asthma attack, but as with pulled calf muscles and oncoming seizures, it's as valid a reason for an injury sub as any other. Granted it might be a little difficult yelling for the timeout when you can't breathe, but it's a totally valid call.
Re: Ultimate with epilepsy [message #138941 is a reply to message #138938] Thu, 23 January 2014 19:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
formeryhb
Messages: 3
Registered: January 2014
Junior Member
On Thursday, January 23, 2014 8:28:02 PM UTC-5, Mike Tamada wrote:
> formeryhb wrote on Thu, 23 January 2014 11:25
>
> > [...]
>
> > it may be very problematic while playing especially if
>
> > it happens halfway through a point. Has that ever
>
> > happened to you? What do you do in that situation?
>
> > Injury?
>
>
>
>
>
> Calling an injury timeout would be what I would recommend.
>
> Even though there's no blood, no separated shoulder, etc.
>
> IME even poor-spirited players recognize and respect the
>
> necessity of injury timeouts.
>
>
>
> I don't have firsthand experience with seizures, but here
>
> are a couple of analogous situations with seemingly
>
> invisible injuries: one time I failed to warm-up, just got
>
> on the line and we pulled the disc. One-third of the way
>
> down the field I strained a calf muscle; I've seen the same
>
> thing happen to other athletes, one minute they're sprinting
>
> and then they slow down with a quizzical look on their face
>
> because you know something's wrong but you can't figure out
>
> what because hey nothing really happened you were simply
>
> running. But then the next couple of steps the burning pain
>
> in your calf tells you that you better slow down and now you
>
> feel like a doofus slowing to a crawl while your teammates
>
> are sprinting down to cover the pull, and you have to call
>
> out "Injury!" with no one within 20 yards of you, no twisted
>
> ankle in a gopher hole, no nothing. But if you try to
>
> sprint you're likely to tear that calf muscle so there's
>
> only one good call to make in this situation: injury sub.
>
>
>
> The other situation is asthma attacks. For some reason
>
> players on the teams that I've advised have been reluctant
>
> to call an injury timeout when they have an asthma attack,
>
> but as with pulled calf muscles and oncoming seizures, it's
>
> as valid a reason for an injury sub as any other. Granted
>
> it might be a little difficult yelling for the timeout when
>
> you can't breathe, but it's a totally valid call.
>
> --
>
> Posted from http://www.rsdnospam.com

I appreciate your insightful response, and I agree that an injury call would be a good place to start, but there are 2 things that make it difficult. The first is that those are two good examples of when to call injury for not-so-clear injuries, but there are still signs. Usually when someone is having an asthma attack they start heaving and hyperventilating. It is clear that something is wrong with them. They will be in obvious distress. The same is with pulling a calf muscle. There are muscles in the calf (posterior tibialis for example) that can be completely torn and you could still have a functioning leg. It'll hurt, but as you say, you can still be sprinting just with a burning pain in your calf. The same applies however, the injured player will be in obvious distress, or they would not call injury. The thing about the type of seizures that have been discussed is that they don't necessarily have any physical symptoms. I have a feeling that teams might get irked if halfway through playing defense on someone, I stop running and just stand there because I had a small seizure, forgot what I was doing, and then call injury.

The second thing is that since you tend to forget what you're doing, I'm afraid of not even thinking about calling injury. There tends to be a short period of blackout during the zoning out; one second I could throw the frisbee and next thing I know the other team could have scored and I will be standing in the same spot.

This is all theoretical of course, like I said in the original post, I have not gotten the chance to actually play yet since the diagnosis, I'm just trying to bounce ideas around
Re: Ultimate with epilepsy [message #138942 is a reply to message #138938] Thu, 23 January 2014 19:52 Go to previous messageGo to next message
EuhNGroups
Messages: 1020
Registered: August 2011
Senior Member
mtamada wrote on Thu, 23 January 2014 17:27

The other situation is asthma attacks.



I've witness that too. Probably a good idea to warn the other team before the game just in case.

I also once played against a deaf/mute player. He was making a weird sound instead of counting so that wasnt a problem. But we were told that he couldnt hear any call/stall count at all.
Re: Ultimate with epilepsy [message #138949 is a reply to message #138941] Fri, 24 January 2014 06:38 Go to previous message
T H
Messages: 1142
Registered: July 2009
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Senior Member
IIRC:

Injury calls are retro active.
A teammate can call injury for you if you're unable to. (Can't remember if that is correct, don't feel like digging this morning, but could also be a provision discussed in the captains meeting pre-tournament & pre-game.

formeryhb wrote on Thu, 23 January 2014 22:45
On Thursday, January 23, 2014 8:28:02 PM UTC-5, Mike Tamada wrote:
> formeryhb wrote on Thu, 23 January 2014 11:25
>
> > [...]
>
> > it may be very problematic while playing especially if
>
> > it happens halfway through a point. Has that ever
>
> > happened to you? What do you do in that situation?
>
> > Injury?
>
>
>
>
>
> Calling an injury timeout would be what I would recommend.
>
> Even though there's no blood, no separated shoulder, etc.
>
> IME even poor-spirited players recognize and respect the
>
> necessity of injury timeouts.
>
>
>
> I don't have firsthand experience with seizures, but here
>
> are a couple of analogous situations with seemingly
>
> invisible injuries: one time I failed to warm-up, just got
>
> on the line and we pulled the disc. One-third of the way
>
> down the field I strained a calf muscle; I've seen the same
>
> thing happen to other athletes, one minute they're sprinting
>
> and then they slow down with a quizzical look on their face
>
> because you know something's wrong but you can't figure out
>
> what because hey nothing really happened you were simply
>
> running. But then the next couple of steps the burning pain
>
> in your calf tells you that you better slow down and now you
>
> feel like a doofus slowing to a crawl while your teammates
>
> are sprinting down to cover the pull, and you have to call
>
> out "Injury!" with no one within 20 yards of you, no twisted
>
> ankle in a gopher hole, no nothing. But if you try to
>
> sprint you're likely to tear that calf muscle so there's
>
> only one good call to make in this situation: injury sub.
>
>
>
> The other situation is asthma attacks. For some reason
>
> players on the teams that I've advised have been reluctant
>
> to call an injury timeout when they have an asthma attack,
>
> but as with pulled calf muscles and oncoming seizures, it's
>
> as valid a reason for an injury sub as any other. Granted
>
> it might be a little difficult yelling for the timeout when
>
> you can't breathe, but it's a totally valid call.
>
> --
>
> Posted from http://www.rsdnospam.com

I appreciate your insightful response, and I agree that an injury call would be a good place to start, but there are 2 things that make it difficult. The first is that those are two good examples of when to call injury for not-so-clear injuries, but there are still signs. Usually when someone is having an asthma attack they start heaving and hyperventilating. It is clear that something is wrong with them. They will be in obvious distress. The same is with pulling a calf muscle. There are muscles in the calf (posterior tibialis for example) that can be completely torn and you could still have a functioning leg. It'll hurt, but as you say, you can still be sprinting just with a burning pain in your calf. The same applies however, the injured player will be in obvious distress, or they would not call injury. The thing about the type of seizures that have been discussed is that they don't necessarily have any physical symptoms. I have a feeling that teams might get irked if halfway through playing defense on someone, I stop running and just stand there because I had a small seizure, forgot what I was doing, and then call injury.

The second thing is that since you tend to forget what you're doing, I'm afraid of not even thinking about calling injury. There tends to be a short period of blackout during the zoning out; one second I could throw the frisbee and next thing I know the other team could have scored and I will be standing in the same spot.

This is all theoretical of course, like I said in the original post, I have not gotten the chance to actually play yet since the diagnosis, I'm just trying to bounce ideas around

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